The Noah Project

Rebuilding a sustainable world.


Leave a comment

Natural Dyes Save Lives

Conventional textile manufacturing is poisonous to its workers and to the land, but there are alternatives.

A new crop of small businesses is investing in organic farming, natural dyes and a transparent supply chain that encourages shoppers to think about the effect of their purchases — and they’re selling their products online and in a small but growing number of US stores, from small trendy boutiques to Target.

These include Colorado-based PACT, which makes underwear and loungewear from all-organic cotton; New Jersey-based Boll and Branch, which sells organic-cotton bedsheets, blankets and towels, and two companies based in Los Angeles — Jungmaven, a hemp and organic-cotton T-shirt company, and Industry of All Nations, whose clothes are made with natural dyes and fibres from around the world.

Visit Gulfnews.com to learn more about the businesses using natural, sustainable textiles to produce their goods..

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Sikkim first fully organic state in India

Sikkim celebrates acheiving the status of the first fully organic state in India.  According to The Indian Express the plan was first proposed in 2003.  It took 13 years to convert 75,000 hectares (over 185,300 acres) to certified organic agricultural land.  It is also judged to be the cleanest state and best in education as well as a top tourist destination.

Sikkim Organic Day was observed at Saramsa Gardens on Wednesday. The day marks Sikkim being declared as the first organic state in India by Hon’ble Prime Minister, Narendra Modi last year.

While speaking at the function, Chief Minister Pawan Chamling, said, “I am hopeful that organic farming will be practised by the Sikkimese people in all generations to come.”

Chamling further spoke on the importance of organic farming and how it could be a rewarding profession. “This kind of farming also leads to healthy soil, good health and healthy environment. Being totally organic does not only make farming an attractive profession, but also gives a clear message to the world that organic farming and chemical free agriculture is the only way to healthy living.”


Leave a comment

Unravel Documentary

This is the final resting place of your cast-off clothing

When people in the West throw their clothes away, their cast-offs often go on a journey east, across the oceans, to India’s industrial interior. From the Kutch District of western India to the northern city of Panipat, garment recyclers turn into yarn the huge bales of clothes that come from people and places distinctly strange. With little exposure to Western culture other than the Discovery Channel, the garment recyclers rely on their imagination and the rumours that travel with the cast-offs to create an an intriguing perspective on the West.

Director: Meghna Gupta

Producer: Meghna Gupta, Gigi Berardi

  • Category

  • License

    • Standard YouTube License


Leave a comment

Balinese School Provides Organic Diet to Autistic Students

I wish I could follow this story over time.  I’d be interested to see what kind of impact feeding only organic food to children with autism and other diabilities has in the long run.  From the article, in TheJakartaPost, it appears there are many other factors, employed by the school, that contribute to the positive outcomes reported here.

Today Yayasan Widya Guna provides daily schooling to over 100 students, both disabled and non-disabled. Besides providing English, exercise and art classes to the children, it also teaches organic farming and promotes a healthy diet among students.

“We’ve received lots of information suggesting that poor nutrition is a factor in developing autism,” said Sri Wahyuni. “Many people who visit want to offer candy to the children, but we don’t allow it.”

The foundation serves meals with lots of vegetables, and tries to not include too many fried foods. Sri Wahyuni says that kids who used to catch colds and the flu rarely fall sick these days. A student with epilepsy, whose parents complained was having three seizures a day, has stopped having seizures completely since he started attending the yayasan.


Leave a comment

Honey Cooperatives Help Afghan Women

I ran across this inspiring article from the Deccan Chronical on how honey cooperatives are helping Afghan women, in a formerly Taliban region, take control of their lives.

In the mountainous central province of Bamiyan, one of the country’s least developed but most liberal regions, beekeeping complements its only other commercial crop, potatoes, and gives rural women the chance to become entrepreneurs.

Four beekeeping cooperatives have been set up here in recent years, backed by NGOs and foreign aid. Starting from scratch, they now employ around 400 people, half of them women, and produce 14 tonnes of honey a year.

These cooperatives not only provide a source of income for the women, but elevate their status and those of their daughters.

When they get a revenue for the first time it helps to establish their position better in the household”, especially girls who are otherwise seen as potential burdens on their families, explains Sadia Fatimie, a consultant for international institutions.

It is widely accepted here by the society that women can be at the frontline to support the family,” says provincial agricultural official Abdul Wahab Mohammadi. “It’s increasing — people see it as a success story and they are copying it.


Leave a comment

ET Alert

If you are a fan of Extra Terrestrials, Science Alert  has an interesting article on the latest plan to contact the closest Earth-like exoplanet in our Solar system:

Scientists are making preparations to send a transmission to Proxima b – the closest Earth-like exoplanet to our Solar System.

The team is putting together a plan to build or buy a powerful deep-space transmitter, and is now figuring out what our message should be…

The non-profit organisation is planning a series of workshops and a crowdfunding drive to make the scheme a reality – and it’s estimated they’ll need to raise around US$1 million a year to run the transmitter.

By 2018, the team wants to have laser or radio signals beamed out to Proxima b, which orbits Proxima Centauri – the closest star to our Solar System, at around 4.25 light-years away.