The Noah Project

Rebuilding a sustainable world.


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Balinese School Provides Organic Diet to Autistic Students

I wish I could follow this story over time.  I’d be interested to see what kind of impact feeding only organic food to children with autism and other diabilities has in the long run.  From the article, in TheJakartaPost, it appears there are many other factors, employed by the school, that contribute to the positive outcomes reported here.

Today Yayasan Widya Guna provides daily schooling to over 100 students, both disabled and non-disabled. Besides providing English, exercise and art classes to the children, it also teaches organic farming and promotes a healthy diet among students.

“We’ve received lots of information suggesting that poor nutrition is a factor in developing autism,” said Sri Wahyuni. “Many people who visit want to offer candy to the children, but we don’t allow it.”

The foundation serves meals with lots of vegetables, and tries to not include too many fried foods. Sri Wahyuni says that kids who used to catch colds and the flu rarely fall sick these days. A student with epilepsy, whose parents complained was having three seizures a day, has stopped having seizures completely since he started attending the yayasan.


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Bali seeks to improve energy self-sufficiency

From the Jakarta Post, Bali seeks to accelerate its energy and agriculture self-sufficiency programs:

In line with its mission to be a “clean and green” and “organic” island, Bali should accelerate its energy and agriculture self-sufficiency programs, an NGO has urged.

I Gede Suarja, coordinator of the BIRU program with the Yayasan Rumah Energi (YRE) foundation in Bali — a program that has initiated the use of household biogas digesters, said that being self-sufficient in energy and agriculture could be achieved by optimizing the use of alternative energy.

“Not only would it save the consumption of non-renewable energy, as in the BIRU program, but it would also support organic farming through the use of bio-slurry [the residue resulting from biogas production] as organic fertilizer for farmland, so farmers would no longer depend on chemical fertilizers,” Suarja said recently.

As an organic fertilizer, bio-slurry had been proven environmentally friendly and able to improve farm land productivity, he said.

According to Suarja, although the island had great potential to produce biogas, the use of this alternative energy was still limited.

“There is great potential to produce biogas, a renewable energy, from livestock dung, as many families in Bali breed pigs, chickens and cows,” he said, illustrating that on average, each farming family on the island bred two to three cows and four to five pigs, which was sufficient as a source of biogas.