The Noah Project

Rebuilding a sustainable world.


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Millennials Meet to “reRoute” Our Economy

Keith Harrington

By: : Huffington Post

In case you missed it, this past spring students at over a dozen universities and colleges across North America gathered on their campuses to lay the foundations of a new millennial-led movement for economic system change. This month, these leaders will take a good hard look at the next strategic steps for their emerging movement when they converge at New York University from July 19 – 21 for the New Economic Institute’s “reRoute: Building Youth and Student Power for a New Economy.”

From climate and clean-energy advocacy, to poverty and migrant rights, contemporary campuses know no shortage of organizing initiatives aimed at addressing the myriad symptoms of our ailing political-economic system. Yet despite these essential efforts, we’ve yet to see the emergence of any major initiatives focused on confronting the root cause of these symptomatic problems: the very structure of our economic system itself.

This is where the reRoute convergence comes in. Like the series of student summits that preceded it, reRoute aims to serve as a catalyst for the growth of a continent-wide network of student and youth leaders dedicated to promoting policies, practices and ideas that can transform our economy into a truly democratic, equitable and ecologically-sustainable system. Continue reading


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Gar Alperovitz suggests what the next economic system might look like.

In What Then Must We Do?, Gar Alperovitz speaks directly to the reader about where we find ourselves in history, why the time is right for a new-economy movement to coalesce, what it means to build a new system to replace the crumbling one, and how we might begin. He also suggests what the  next system might look like—and where we can see its outlines, like an image slowly emerging in the developing trays of a photographer’s darkroom, already taking shape.

He proposes a possible next system that is not corporate capitalism, not state socialism, but something else entirely—and something entirely American.

Alperovitz calls for an evolution, not a revolution, out of the old system and into the new. That new system would democratize the ownership of wealth, strengthen communities in diverse ways, and be governed by policies and institutions sophisticated enough to manage a large-scale, powerful economy.