The Noah Project

Rebuilding a sustainable world.


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Fifth Season Cooperative Expands Product Line

It’s so amazing to be living here in Wisconsin.  We have a conservative state legislature that passed a bill watering down environmental protections in favor of an out-of-state mining operation that wants to open a strip mine in one of the most ecologically pristine areas in the state.  We have acre upon acre of GE corn and soy growing every year.

On the other hand, we have this:

The Fifth Season Cooperative, founded in August 2010, is co-owned by farmers, distributors, buyers, producer groups, workers and processors within a 150-mile radius of Viroqua.
The cooperative produces and distributes locally grown produce, meats, dairy and value-added food products to institutional and foodservice buyers from farms and regional processors through its distribution member, Reinhart FoodService. Fifth Season requires sustainable practices and provides fair pricing for small and mid-sized growers and processors. The cooperative also works together with businesses and organizations to provide education on and increased exposure to locally produced foods.
Current membership includes 30 independent farms, three farmer cooperatives, 11 processors and two distributors.  Hundreds of foodservice buyers have access to Fifth Season’s products through Reinhart, La  Crosse. Continue reading


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Sno Pac Foods – Organic since 1943

Sno Pac Foods

CALEDONIA, Minn. — The Gengler family and its Sno Pac Foods Inc., founded in 1943, are pioneers in frozen organic food.

In fact, the Caledonia business says it was the world’s first grower/processor of frozen organic vegetables. Today, it also sells frozen fruit and frozen juice concentrate.

This summer, the 70-year-old company is expanding into a new addition to its offices and processing plant at 521 W. Enterprise St. The new 27,000-square-foot structure houses additional freezers and soon will house packaging operations, which are moving from another building in Caledonia. A public open house will be held when the project is completed, company President Pete Gengler said. Continue reading


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And you thought it was bad here

From Ally Bruschi’s article in The Daily Mail:

Endless food scandals throughout the past few years have Chinese consumers growing suspicious and weary of their grocery store produce —enough so for more well-off families to begin seeking organic alternatives to their traditional foods.

For example, Catherine Ho Wai-man and her family have stopped buying produce from neighborhood markets after Ho found “a suspicious white substance leaching out from the greens she had bought at a stall.”

As an alternative, the family has started growing their own greens in the backyard of their home, located in a northern Beijing suburb. In the winter, the family shops for organic produce at high-end supermarkets, willing to accept the higher costs in exchange for ensured food safety.

Many urban residents in Beijing, however, live in tiny apartments and lack the garden space and economic resources to adopt the Ho family’s solution. While the government struggles to live up to its pledge to protect its people from hazardous foods, many city-dwellers have taken extra precautions with washing, peeling, and boiling their produce before consuming or cooking it.

Some city residents have found solutions in eco-farms, which produce organic foods that can be delivered to your home for around $20 per week. The eco-farms aim to bridge the trust gap between consumers who fear for their personal health and safety and producers who need to sell their food.