The Noah Project

Rebuilding a sustainable world.


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Recommended Reading for Advent

The Catholic News Service has compiled a selection of recent releases that might be suitable for your spiritual reading during Advent, which begins Dec. 1, and the Christmas season:

– “Advent and Christmas Wisdom from St. Augustine” by Agnes Cunningham, SSCM. Liguori Publications (Liguori, Mo., 2013). 102 pp., $11.99.

–“The Art of Pausing: Meditations for the Overworked and Overwhelmed” by Judith Valente, Brother Paul Quenon, OSCO and Michael Bever. ACTA Publications (Chicago, 2013). 215 pp., $14.95.

– “Encountering Jesus in Word, Sacraments and Works of Charity” by Msgr. Peter J. Vaghi. Ave Maria Press (Notre Dame, Ind., 2013). 128 pp., $12.95.

– “God’s Bucket List: Heaven’s Surefire Way to Happiness in This Life and Beyond” by Teresa Tomeo. Image Books (New York, 2013). 176 pp., $17.99.

– “Faith Beginnings: Family Nurturing From Birth Through Preschool” by Michele E. Chronister and Amy M. Garro. Liguori Publications (Liguori, Mo., 2013). 140 pp., $14.99.

– “Startled by God: Wisdom From Unexpected Places” by Joe McHugh. Franciscan Media (Cincinnati, 2013). 122 pp., $14.99.

– “On a Mission: Lessons From St. Francis de Sales” by Patrick Madrid. Servant Books (Cincinnati, 2013). 138 pp., $15.99.

– “Open Mind, Faithful Heart: Reflections on Following Jesus” by Pope Francis. Translated by Joseph V. Owens, SJ. Herder & Herder (New York, 2013). 297 pp., $29.95.

– “When Faith Feels Fragile: Help for the Wary, Weak and Wandering” by R. Scott Hurd. Pauline Books and Media (Boston, 2013). 208 pp., $12.95. Continue reading


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San Francisco leading the way with sustainability development program.

San Francisco is, again, ahead of the curve in working with California’s sustainability guidelines to establish a program to reduce water consumption, reduce waste and enhance community-scale energy resources.  Architect News  reports on a new tool called Eco-Districts that will help them get to their goal:

To aid in the fulfillment of these goals, the program is implementing a tool called  – a community of property owners, businesses and residents within a neighborhood that collaborate to develop and initiate sustainable development projects in their area.  Using a set of performance metrics, neighborhoods can shape their projects with custom strategies for their community.

The Eco-District is fundamentally a community-driven development that has the potential to achieve the smart growth of sustainable ideas but also build local urban identity and enforce a sense of place among its residents.  The Eco-District movement has already taken shape in Austin (TX), Boston (MA), Seattle (WA),  Washington DC, and Portland (OR) in various degrees of development.  San Francisco’s adoption of this tool will help drive the successes of the Sustainability Development Program with a focus on holistic approaches of neighborhood development and support with environmentally conscious improvements. Continue reading


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Bloomberg still trying to create the nanny state – in a good way.

English: New York Mayor, Michael R. Bloomberg.

English: New York Mayor, Michael R. Bloomberg. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If the endeavor gets off the ground, all 8 million residents of the most populated city in the United States will have to start putting aside food waste and other organic materials, such as houseplants and eggshells, then package them separately to be picked up by specialized trash collectors.

Compostable waste will have to be differentiated from other garbage and recyclables, and in a few years’ time the city could start imposing fines on those who fail to comply, the paper reported.
Only four months ago, Bloomberg hinted at the program in his State of the City address when he said food waste was “New York City’s final recycling frontier.”
We bury 1.2 million tons of food waste in landfills every year at a cost of nearly $80 per ton,” he said. “That waste can be used as fertilizer or converted to energy at a much lower price. That’s good for the environment and for taxpayers.”
In cities where similar programs are in place, residents are already seeing what good can come. In San Francisco, more than one million tons of organic waste has been collected since the program started 16 years ago, in turn helping the city divert roughly 80 percent of waste that would otherwise be sent to a landfill.
Parts of Staten Island, a borough of New York, already started attempting an organic waste recycling program last April. According to the city’s senior sanitation official, 43 percent of the 3,500 single-family homes have begun participating already. If the program becomes widespread, city officials tell the times they want to start off by offering organ waste containers to around 150,000 single family homes by the end of the year.